A Quick Tip on Motivating A Person With ASD

Use your loved one’s interests to help them through new or disliked tasks. eg. Use a sticker chart with his/ her favorite characters to check off today’s tasks.

Note: Check for understanding and ability first. No amount of motivation will work if a task is confusing or too difficult.

Rebecca J Weaver is a Certified Autism Specialist at Independent with Autism, working to empower individuals with ASD.  Need help with work completion? Check out IndependentwithAutism.com for more information.

Scented Surroundings: Sensory Overload

You are shopping with a friend and have already visited several stores he/ she enjoys when you notice your favorite store.  You take a deep breath, already enjoying the scents, and start to head into the store.  You notice your friend has stopped and doesn’t want to go in. You may feel like your friend is acting selfish. You’ve already gone into the stores he/ she picked.  More likely, your friend is experiencing a sensory overload.  It may be extremely difficult for him/her to walk through that door, after all the scents are so strong they are even wafting out of the store.

Think of your reason for shopping with your friend.  Are you there to do errands? To check things off your list? Or, more likely, are you there to spend time with each other? Understand your friend’s difficulty with that store, and come back to it another time.

Rebecca J Weaver is a Certified Autism Specialist at Independent with Autism, working to empower individuals with ASD. Need help creating your success strategies? Check out IndependentwithAutism.com for more information.

Communication Breakdown

Situation: The Bill

You are enjoying lunch with a friend.  It’s time for the check, and your friend offers to pay for your meal.  You gladly accept.  The next time the two of you go out, your friend is surprised when you want to split the bill.  What happened?

Aspie and autistic friends:  The social expectation is that when someone pays for you, the next time you should be prepared to pay for them. So the next time you go out, offer to pay for your friend’s meal.

Neurotypical friends: Your Aspie/ autistic friend may have missed the cues that it is their turn to pick up the tab.  Explain why you are feeling surprised, and decide how you both want to handle these types of situations in the future.

Conversation: Information Dump or More? A quick note on chatting for people with ASD

Ever notice how people are forever talking? Sometimes, they seem to talk about nothing.  Here are 3 points about conversation you might not know.

1. It’s more than sharing information

Conversation is about making a connection with another person.  The information exchanged is secondary.

2. It’s not about you

Conversation is about learning what the other person knows, and how they are interesting.

3. It’s the gateway to making friends, getting a job, making deals…

People are friends with those they share a connection with.  Employers hire people they have a connection with, even before others that have more knowledge.

Rebecca J Weaver is a Certified Autism Specialist at Independent with Autism, working to empower individuals with ASD.  Need help with conversation and making connections? Check out IndependentwithAutism.com for more information.