A Quick Tip…

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Rebecca J Weaver is a Certified Autism Specialist at Independent with Autism, working to empower individuals with ASD. Need help creating your success strategies? Check out IndependentwithAutism.com for more information.

A Quick Tip on Motivating A Person With ASD

Use your loved one’s interests to help them through new or disliked tasks. eg. Use a sticker chart with his/ her favorite characters to check off today’s tasks.

Note: Check for understanding and ability first. No amount of motivation will work if a task is confusing or too difficult.

Rebecca J Weaver is a Certified Autism Specialist at Independent with Autism, working to empower individuals with ASD.  Need help with work completion? Check out IndependentwithAutism.com for more information.

This Year I Resolve To… Making Resolutions That Stick

It’s a New Year, and people like to make resolutions.  Many people fall short on their self promises.  How can you keep with your goals this year?

  1. Write your goal down somewhere where you can see it fairly frequently to remind yourself of whaat you are working on.
  2. Break your goal down into small steps. Make each step easily achievable.  As your success builds you can take bigger steps.  If you like technology, use it to set reminders of what you’re working towards and to track your progress.
  3. Plan a time frame for each step.  If you are changing a behavior, work on each small step at least 30 days before adding more change.  Once each new habit is firmly established, then go to the next step.
  4. Celebrate each success along the way.

Happy New Year’s!

Rebecca J Weaver is a Certified Autism Specialist at Independent with Autism, working to empower individuals with ASD. Need help setting achievable goals? Check out IndependentwithAutism.com for more information.

 Communication Quick Tip

If you are making a request of someone with ASD/ Asperger’s Syndrome, state it in the positive.  Say what you want rather than what you don’t want.  For example: “Please put your clothes in the hamper” instead of “Don’t leave your clothes on the floor.”

Rebecca J Weaver is a Certified Autism Specialist at Independent with Autism, working to empower individuals with ASD. Looking for better ways to communicate? Check out IndependentwithAutism.com for more information.

7 Reasons to Employ People with ASD

  1. Dedication: People with Autism and Asperger’s Syndrome tend to be dedicated to their jobs.  Low turnover is a perk of hiring people with ASD. They are less likely to be “sick” the day after the Super Bowl, the newest Star Wars release, or even a historic World Series.
  2. A Different Perspective: People that have ASD see the world differently. As a result, they find solutions where others don’t even think to look.
  3. Quality Control: People with ASD tend to be rule followers, and will enforce your standards emphatically.
  4. Safety First: Because of their strict rule following, people that have Autism and Asperger’s have good safety records, qualifying you for great worker’s comp insurance rates.
  5. Social Compassion: Employing individuals with Autism and Asperger’s gives you a unique position.  Patrons are likely to try your brand/ work with your company for the “feel good factor,” and then stay once they realize the quality of your service/ products.
  6. Increased Management Skills: Managers with people that have ASD on their team learn to view every person as an individual, enabling creativity and helping each member of their entire team to grow.
  7. Increased Inclusiveness:  The consideration for each individual demonstrated by the managers is adopted by the team, making your workplace a pleasant one.

Rebecca J Weaver is a Certified Autism Specialist at Independent with Autism, working to empower individuals with ASD. Looking to increase the productivity of your workplace? Check out IndependentwithAutism.com for more information.

Communication Breakdown

Situation: The Bill

You are enjoying lunch with a friend.  It’s time for the check, and your friend offers to pay for your meal.  You gladly accept.  The next time the two of you go out, your friend is surprised when you want to split the bill.  What happened?

Aspie and autistic friends:  The social expectation is that when someone pays for you, the next time you should be prepared to pay for them. So the next time you go out, offer to pay for your friend’s meal.

Neurotypical friends: Your Aspie/ autistic friend may have missed the cues that it is their turn to pick up the tab.  Explain why you are feeling surprised, and decide how you both want to handle these types of situations in the future.