A Quick Tip on Learning New Things

It’s called a learning curve, not instant success.

Keep trying!  When you evaluate what is working and what is not, each step brings you closer to your goal.

Rebecca J Weaver is a Certified Autism Specialist at Independent with Autism, working to empower individuals with ASD. Need help with mental flexibility? Check out IndependentwithAutism.com for more information.

The Power of Mistakes

At the heart of the difficulty giving and receiving advice/ criticism is our view of mistakes. We frown upon mistakes, emphasizing the weakness and even the failure illustrated as a negative, rather than an encouragement to try new things and progress. There is a tendency to view mistakes/ failure as the final product, rather than part of a much bigger process where each mistake directs the next step and refines the goal.  This approach to mistakes is the greatest error. Mistakes are experiences that provide information.  It is how we use this information that is negative or positive. The occurrence of a mistake allows for observation, reflection, and self-correction. Mistakes can provide a positive experience and a necessary tool for learning. They are a key in developing resilience. If we can reframe the concept of a mistake as a form of information collection, we can assist those with Autism and Asperger’s Syndrome in becoming independent and strong. Our greatest leaps forward come from our courage to take a chance, make a mistake, and learn.

Rebecca J Weaver is a Certified Autism Specialist at Independent with Autism, working to empower individuals with ASD. Need help reframing your experiences? Check out IndependentwithAutism.com for more information. @IWAutism

Using Positive Messages

We strive to constantly improve ourselves, and have a tendency to use criticism to help others achieve their goals. In our eagerness to point out errors or areas for improvement we often forget the effectiveness of acknowledging what’s working well.  When assisting those with ASD it is imperative that we use positive strategies as our primary source.  Despite the good intentions of some critiques, individuals with Autism and Asperger’s Syndrome may hold on to the negative aspects of these statements.  Rather than inspiring change, criticisms tend to cause individuals with ASD to overly focus on their difficulties.  They may become stuck, afraid to risk another mistake. In fact, 10 positive experiences may be necessary in order to erase 1 negative experience caused by criticism.   To encourage progress, begin by emphasizing strengths.  This will be necessary in order to overcome previous criticisms.  And the next step?  I’ll be releasing a blog on the topic of mistakes.  Check back here to find out more.

 

Rebecca J Weaver is a Certified Autism Specialist at Independent with Autism, working to empower individuals with ASD. Need help creating positive strategies? Check out IndependentwithAutism.com for more information.

A Quick Tip on Motivating A Person With ASD

Use your loved one’s interests to help them through new or disliked tasks. eg. Use a sticker chart with his/ her favorite characters to check off today’s tasks.

Note: Check for understanding and ability first. No amount of motivation will work if a task is confusing or too difficult.

Rebecca J Weaver is a Certified Autism Specialist at Independent with Autism, working to empower individuals with ASD.  Need help with work completion? Check out IndependentwithAutism.com for more information.

 Communication Quick Tip

If you are making a request of someone with ASD/ Asperger’s Syndrome, state it in the positive.  Say what you want rather than what you don’t want.  For example: “Please put your clothes in the hamper” instead of “Don’t leave your clothes on the floor.”

Rebecca J Weaver is a Certified Autism Specialist at Independent with Autism, working to empower individuals with ASD. Looking for better ways to communicate? Check out IndependentwithAutism.com for more information.

A Quick Tip on Plans

When planning for everyday outings, and special events, remember things can always change.  Make a preferred plan and have an alternate plan in case of unforeseen events.  Share these plans with the ones going on the outing, so that they have an idea of what to expect.

Rebecca J Weaver is a Certified Autism Specialist at Independent with Autism, working to empower individuals with ASD.  Need help with mental flexibility? Check out IndependentwithAutism.com for more information.

An Ounce of Prevention…

Benjamin Franklin wrote “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”  Although he was referring to fire prevention, this phrase applies to so much more.  It is especially true for helping people that have Autism Spectrum Disorder and Asperger’s Syndrome.

When approaching a new experience, the more we can prepare for the expectations of that experience, the better off everyone will be.  There are many ways to do this.

Here’s one idea for you: If you are going to a new place, find a map of the location and then play with it.  Notice the different ways you can begin the experience.  Are there multiple entrances? What will the experience be like if you start in one entrance versus another.  Plan your journey. Draw the path on the map that you would like to take, draw a second path to present another option and also be prepared to draw another path on the map when you get there, if something unforeseen should occur.  Being aware that your plan may need to change, is a big part of the preparation.

Rebecca J Weaver is a Certified Autism Specialist at Independent with Autism, working to empower individuals with ASD.  Need help creating your success strategies? Check out IndependentwithAutism.com for more information.